Micro:bit basics

 

The Micro:bit is a small programmable piece of hardware (equipment) that is half the size of a credit card. It has a display consisting of 25 LEDs andhas two programmable buttons. It can be powered by USB, an external battery pack (2 AAA cells) or by a 3V 'button battery.


It has a processor (made by ARM) an accelerometer (to sense movement) and a magnetometer (to sense compass direction)

 

It has Bluetooth and USB connectivity. The device inputs and outputs are through five ring connectors that form part of a larger 25-pin edge connector. (edited from Wikipedia page)

 

TOP 10 Microbit Links

 

Primary


1. 1st steps

2. Animation

3.Code club ideas

4. Get creative

5. Lessons


Secondary

 

1. Sensors

2. Python interface

3.Python Reference

4. Design challenges

5. Lessons


Collaboration and sharing


The microbit classroom can now be used to share projects with your students (either at home or in class)


Once you’ve launched your classroom session you will have the option to add your own code to the classroom editor to share with your students.

Video tutorial from micro:bit foundation 



Random number coding with Mr Smith.pdf
micro:bit coding
Image description

Learn new things


1. micro:bit:foundation (great content to show your class)

2. Controllable fan from AmazingICT with relay from Monkmakes

3. Sensing with XinaBox Mini engineering

4. Remote control car A DIY project for schools

5. Micro:bit adventure at the BETT show

6. Using an iPad to flash code to the micro:bit

Showcase schools


Grange Park Primary (Telford): Case study

Oakmeadow Primary (Shrewsbury): Webpage of ideas

Apley Wood Primary (Telford): Webpage of ideas

Meadows Primary (Telford): Blogposts



Global challenge


Global challenge winners 2020


Blogs


Rob Leeman. ARM Education

ARM Microbit course

ARM resources page


AmazingICT MAY Newsletter here

May_Newsletter.pdf
Computing and Esafety news

Buying microbits

 

AmazingICT buys micro:bits from Kitronik. Other suppliers are listed here

 

Scheme of work from mb4ps (thanks to Neil Rickus)